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Veterinary Acupuncture for Your Dog

Veterinary Acupuncture for Your DogWho would have ever thought to use acupuncture on your dog, but apparently this is a legit solution option. Essentially it’s just the same as using acupuncture in the human body in that it’s used as a holistic method to help the body heal itself.

With acupuncture, the veterinarian (trained in traditional Chinese veterinary medicine, aka TCVM), inserts needles into body tissue where nerve bundles and blood vessels come together.
Allegedly, this produces enhanced blood circulation, nervous system stimulation, and the release of anti-inflammatory and pain relieving hormones. As a result, this apparently encourages healing by correcting energy imbalances in the body.

The upside is that veterinary acupuncture lacks potential adverse side effects for your dog which might occur with prescription and over the counter pain medications.

Interested in Learning More?
Dr. Lucy O’Byrne, who is a Certified Veterinary Acupuncturist, will be speaking at this free informational seminar on Wednesday, March 12, 2014. This is a great opportunity to learn more about a holistic approach to treating your dog. She will also be providing a demonstration on how acupuncture is used on her very own dog.

Date:  Wednesday, March 12
Time:  7:00pm
Location:
West Village Vets
75 8th Avenue, New York, NY 10014 

Please RSVP by calling (212) 633-7400
or by e-mailing wvvh@dvmhospitals.com

How to Help Your Sick Dog With Diarrhea

Sick dog with Diarrhea

Dogs like people do get sick. Fortunately, there are some home remedies for a sick dog. One miracle food for sick dogs is PUMPKIN!

Fall and Winter is a great time to fill up on fresh and unsweetened (not pie filling) canned pumpkin. It’s very helpful to have on hand and it can be hard to find pumpkin during other times of the year. So get a few extra cans of pumpkin now and it might save you (and your dog) some heartache later.

Because it is high in fiber, pumpkin is good for constipation or diarrhea in dogs because it regulates the water in the digestive tract. Our dog, Kobi, has had some bouts of diarrhea and it’s worked very well for Kobi.

While Kobi rarely gets diarrhea, I do keep a couple cans in my pantry “just in case”. Previously, I have been in the situation where I couldn’t find any fresh or canned pumpkin. It was in the middle of the summer and I was able to find some other orange squash which was related to pumpkin and it worked similarly on Kobi. So if you can’t find pumpkin, try butternut squash.

Rice is also a good food to feed your dog when it has an upset tummy and needs a bland meal. There are a variety of different types of rice. Brown rice is a little higher in protein and a little lower in fat when compared to white rice. White or instant rice is an easily digestible carbohydrate which makes it a good source of energy when your dog has an upset tummy and isn’t feeling well.

Last but not least, you need to judge for yourself and your dog whether or not they need to go to the vet. Sometimes home remedies can help your dog, but other times you really need to take them to the vet. Unfortunately, as a pet parent, you cannot simply ask them what their various symptoms are and get an answer from them. If in doubt, be safe and take your sick dog to the vet.

Top 4 Ways to Get a Dog to Take Medicine

Get a Dog to Take MedicineGetting a dog to take medicine is not always easy. My dog is a picky eater and very smart, so it’s a challenge to feed him medicine.  He has allergies and occasionally needs to take medicines when he scratches too much.

Here’s a list of how to get a dog to take medicine based on ease from a simple solutions to hard core pill spitters (like Kobi).

Very Easy: Hide the medicine in your dog’s food. If your dog eats all of it and the medicine, congratulations your dog is super easy to give medicines too!
Tip: it’s easier to hide medicines in wet food.

Easy: Wrap the pill in something your dog loves, give it to your dog and down it goes. There are endless variations on this method: wrapping in cheese, peanut butter, bacon, lunch meat, hotdogs, Pill Pockets and / or freezing the wrapped pill. Wrapping tablets in bacon worked for with my dog, but it doesn’t work for him if I have to give him a capsule.

Medium / Hard: Put the pill in the back of your dog’s mouth. Close their mouth and hold their mouth shut and your dog swallows the pill. Then give a dog treat to your dog after they swallow the pill.
Extra tip: put a bit of soft cheese around the pill, then put it in the back of your dog’s mouth. Close their mouth and hold their snout shut and with your other hand stroke their neck – stroking the neck triggers the dog to swallow.

pestle

Pestle

Hard: My dog is an expert pill spitter. If he notices a pill in his food, he will spit it out.
Now, I use a pestle to grind up the hard pills. If they are in capsules, I open them up. Check with the vet if this is ok for the meds the dog is taking. Then I put the pill powder in my dog’s wet dog food. Add some extra treats in the dog food to make sure it’s extra yummy (e.g. small bits of chicken, tuna, cheese, bacon, other favorite treats). The “extra yummy” bits need to be small enough so your dog can’t sort them out from the rest of the food. This has been my fool proof way go get my dog to take his medicine.

Please don’t give your pet any medicine unless it’s subscribed and / or approved by your vet.