Quantcast

The Yellow Dog Project – A Great Idea

yellow dog projectWe recently learned about the Yellow Dog Project and think it’s a great idea! Yellow Dogs are dogs who need space – they are not necessarily aggressive dogs, but often are dogs who have issues of fear; pain from recent surgery; are a rescue or shelter dog who has not yet had sufficient training or mastered obedience; are in training for work or service; are in service; or other reasons specific to the dog.

If you have a “Yellow Dog”, you put a yellow ribbon on your leash or dog that can easily been seen so that other dog owners know if advance that your dog needs some space and not to go close towards these dogs.

They also have a list of what a Yellow Dog Project is NOT:

  • It is not an excuse to avoid proper training
  • It is not a waiver of responsibility
  • It is not an admittance of guilt or a confession

The Yellow Dog Project hopes to educate the public and dog owners to identify dogs needing space, promote appropriate contact of dogs and assist dog parents to identify their dog as needing space.

Protect Your Dog’s Paws from Getting Burned

hot asphalt awareness

Hot Asphalt Awareness

Press the back of your hand firmly against the asphalt for 7 seconds to verify it will be comfortable for your dog. The last thing anyone wants is a dog with burnt paws.

If needed and your dog is small enough, pick him up if the asphalt is too hot. Alternatively, you can get your dog some summer dog boots to protect his paws from the hot ground.

paws

paws

Dog Safety for Summer Parties

We hope you enjoy all the summer parties this season with your best friend and wanted to share a few dog safety tips.

Food at the Party

I’m sure your dog will be enjoying the party as much as you will,bad foods for dogs but they’ll also be using their cute brown eyes and charm to entice your guest to give them food. Clearly you need to be watching your dog, but also politely inform friends what your dog food rules are.
Make sure your dog doesn’t eat these human foods (see our list) and if your hosting the party, we would advise you don’t have grapes or chocolate finger food snacks just to be on the safe side. If you think your dog has eaten something dangerous, contact your vet or the Pet Poison Hotline.

Grass

dog_in_grassWhile many dogs love to roll around on the grass (and eat it too), many people do spray their lawns and grass with insecticides. Unfortunately, these can also be toxic to your dog.

Fireworks

It’s best to leave your pet at home (or indoors) during fireworks displays. Many dogs are very frightened of the noise. If your dog has a lot of anxiety from the sound of fireworks, you might want to consider getting a Thunder Shirt.
ThunderShirt

If you have fireworks at your home, be extra careful. Curious pets can easily get traumatized &/or burned if they are too close to a firework. Unlit fireworks can contain toxic ingredients if eaten or chewed on by your dog.

Heat

You definitely also want to check out our our “Hot Weather Tips for Dogs” which will get you the latest on keeping your dog cool while it’s hot!

Bugs

All the creepy crawlers come out to play in the warm summer months. Be sure your dog is receiving monthly preventatives to protect against fleas, ticks and heartworm disease. See also our category of Anti-Itch and Anti-Insect products.

Now that we’ve got that all covered – go out there and enjoy those amazing summer parties!!!

Urban Dogs – You’re Not Safe From Coyotes

CoyoteFrom January 15th to March 15th, coyotes from Canada to Mexico go through their mating cycle. While coyotes can be a year round concern, they become more territorial and aggressive during mating season. Coyotes can jump fences and have no respect for human territory. Smaller breeds such as Yorkies are more susceptible to being attacked.

Many of you might be thinking – hey, I live in a city, there’s no wildlife here, so this coyote issue doesn’t apply to me. Unfortunately, things are changing. in 2014 woman was attacked by a coyote walking her dog in Rockland County, New York.

01coyoteonroof.aptA friend of Dogsized also lost their dog to a coyote when she was walking in her gated community with both her child and her dog when the coyote attacked and took their dog. We’ve also heard about celebrities (e.g. Jessica Simpson and Ozzy Osbourne) that have lost their dogs to coyotes.

Attacks are on the rise in urban areas. In 2015, within two weeks, there were 6 sightings of coyotes in NYC!

What can you do to keep your dogs safe?
Top priority is awareness. As scavengers, coyotes are looking for food. They hunt most actively at night and they will raid your garbage. They emerge from their dens in the early evening to begin their hunt for food and return in the early morning.

coyote on trainCoyotes are opportunists, so it’s important to take cautions not to give them an opportunity. For example:

  • Keep small dogs and other pets indoors from dusk until dawn.
  • Feed your pets indoors or if you feed them outdoors do so during the day and never leave pet food out at night.
  • Make sure trash is not left outside in bags and that all trash cans have secure lids with locking mechanisms. Secure the cans to a fence or wall with rope or elastic cord so the trash cannot be tipped over.
  • Install motion sensitive lights in your back yard and around your house
  • Remove your bird feeders and outdoor pet food containers – coyotes will prey upon the small mammals that are attracted to them.
  • Remember – coyotes can jump fences and walls. They are also good diggers and will dig under fences. So even if you have a tall fence around your backyard might not keep your dog safe outside. You need to take steps to make your fence “coyote proof”
  • For more information on Coyotes, please visit the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife page on Coyotes.

We’re not anti-coyote, but want to inform you that this really is an issue. Don’t think that because you and your dog are in an urban environment that you’re safe. Definitely be more aware during January – March, especially at night. More questions? Check out these FAQs.